Happiness Interview: Jesse Billauer, Founder of the Life Rolls On Foundation

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You’re 17, and the most pressing concerns in your life are binge-drinking, prom, and being your parents’ worst nightmare.  The so-called “real world” is incomprehensible to you, and you’re still proud of that freshly printed piece of plastic in your wallet called a “driver’s license.” Doesn’t 17 seem far away?  That’s because it is.  For most of the people who read this blog, senior year, college, and first jobs have come and gone since then.  But 17 is how old Jesse Billauer was when he lost the use of his legs.  He was just a kid.

It was a morning of beautiful 6 to 8 footers and Jesse was coming out of the tail-end of a barrel.  The wave hit him in the back causing him to fall forward headfirst into a shallow sandbar.  The force of the impact severed the C6 vertebrae in Jesse’s spine instantly paralyzing him.  Floating face down in the ocean, unable to move and tingling all over, Jesse prayed a wave would turn him over so he could breathe.  When one did, he screamed for help, but his friends thought he was kidding, so it was several minutes before someone swam over.  They kept Jesse’s head above water as their surfboards hit them from all directions.  His friends pulled him to shore, and on the sand, Jesse relates that his dreams flashed before his eyes.  He had imagined he would eventually grace the covers of surfing magazines.  That he would find the right girl and marry.  That he would graduate from college.  But on that day, Jesse opened his eyes to a hospital room with tubes in his throat, and an entirely different life.

Today, Jesse is a sponsored surfer who rides bigger waves than I would ever dare to.  He heads a foundation called Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, where Jesse helps others with disabilities find their stoke again.  His story has been heard by millions of people in places like Good Morning America, the TODAY show, Dateline NBC, and the popular surf film “Step Into Liquid.”

“Let me get this straight: you want to drive 5 hours for an in-person interview instead of doing it over the phone?”

“Yes, yes I do.”

I inched like a caterpillar through famously bad traffic to north Los Angeles to meet Jesse because he’s a hero of mine.  I really, really wanted to meet him face to face.  He’s a hero of mine for several reasons.  For one, he’s a testament to that old adage: what the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve.  Two, Jesse’s given his life over to a cause greater than himself.  He understands we are all here to help one another – that that’s the most important thing.  And when you look back on your life, you’re not going think about the awards you received, the money you made, or the toys you bought.  You’re going to remember the moments you lived in a spirit of love for others.  And can you think of anything more worthwhile than taking a child who never thought they could surf again, surfing?  I’ll answer for that one for you: no.  Thirdly, Jesse could teach all of us a thing or two about having a good attitude.  And lastly, damn, I know I have a boyfriend, but Mr. Billauer is not an unattractive man.

Photo cred: postmodernsurfer.com

Photo cred: postmodernsurfer.com

I hope this interview makes you take pause.  Life can be very hard, and inexplicably unfair.  But as Jesse says, the most important things in life are your health and your own happiness.  Try to have some perspective and appreciate the little things, as I think Mr. Billauer does.  And I’m not religious, I’m spiritual, but Mr. Billauer’s story strengthens my faith of a different nature: a faith in the good of people.  His interview brings to me to tears because I think he knows what is life really is about: connecting with others.  Helping each other.  For the foregoing reasons, I’m a huge Jesse Billauer-fan.  His gorgeous blue eyes don’t hurt, either.

NH:  What is your advice to 20-somethings who are trying to find their way? 

JB: My advice for anyone in their 20’s is: try all the things you feel you want to do.  Find what your passion is.  Don’t follow your friends’ dreams, your parents’ dreams – you have got to follow your own, because those are the ones that are going to make you the most happy.  And finding out what you love, what your passion is, will get you the money.  Don’t be driven by just the money.  If you have a lot of money but your job sucks, it’s only going to last for so long.  But if you love what you do, the money will come, and come, and come, and it will just feel easy.  When you love something, everything is just seamless.

Photo credit: CI Surfboards

CI Surfboards

NH: Could you tell us about your foundation Life Rolls On? 

JB: Life Rolls On started about fifteen, sixteen years ago because I got injured and I wanted to give back and start a foundation where I could help other people with disabilities.  I was doing all these interviews about what happened to me, and all these people said, ‘Hey man, life goes on… life goes on…’ And I looked down, and I said, “Man, I roll on.  Life rolls on.”  And everybody just loved the name so we trademarked it.  At first we were just doing some small events, some golf tournaments here in Marina Del Rey.  Then we started these other programs called They Will Surf Again (TWSA), They Will Ski Again (TWSkiA) and They Will Skate Again (TWSkateA).  We take people with disabilities out there so they can still stay active, to surf, to skate, to ski – and it’s just grown.  We also do other events, like concerts and poker tournaments.  Our big fundraiser is called “Night by the Ocean” and it’s an auction dinner and concert in Marina Del Rey.  That’s where we try to raise the money for the year to put on all the programs.  We do the programs in California, Florida, New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina.

It’s super rewarding to see families, people to come out to the events and they have a huge smile on their face.  It changes their life, it builds their confidence, and it makes them feel free – not paralyzed when they’re in the water.  Just that little moment, man, takes them throughout the year.  It keeps that smile on their face.

NH: You seem like you have a great attitude.  Do you have any advice for staying positive? 

JB: Everybody always has to something to look forward to.  Whether it’s big or small, whether it’s tomorrow or in a month from now, you have to have something to look forward to in life or it’s going to be terrible.  If you always just think about the negative, I don’t care if you have all the money in the world, all the health – you’re not going to be happy.  It’s all about trying to see the positive in everything, and realizing that while everything might not be easy, there’s a way to make it better.  You’ve just got to look ahead and have something to look forward to.  Whether it’s next week the weather is going to be nice, or you’re going on a date, a movie is coming out, there’s a concert, or whatever.  But if you don’t have anything to look forward to, you won’t have a good life.

NH: What are some simple activities that consistently make you happier? 

JB:  Playing poker, surfing, fishing, going to concerts, and raising awareness for Life Rolls On.  Honestly, I live, eat, breathe, sleep Life Rolls On, and to be able to share the story, to be able to raise money, to be able to raise exposure – I do that everywhere.  Everybody I meet, I talk about my life, but I talk about Life Rolls On because that is my life.  When you’re dealing with a foundation, or you’re dealing with a company, a brand – if you don’t eat, sleep, and breathe it, it’s going to get swallowed up by every other company or foundation out there.  You have to believe in it before anybody else can believe in it.

NH:  What is your definition of happiness? 

JB: Warm weather, soft skin, a full house, a big fish, and a beautiful wave.

NH:  What’s something you know about happiness now that you did not know at 25 years old? 

JB:  You don’t need to go out as much, you don’t need all the money  you thought, you don’t need all the jewelry, or the flashiness.  Being happy could be sitting in the sun, throwing a rod in the ocean, watching a movie with your loved one.  I wish I knew what I know now back in the day.  I’d be ahead of my game.

NH: What does “stoke” mean to you? 

JB: Being comfortable, and being comfortable for me is being warm.  Being able to do the things I love.  To challenge myself, be competitive, to be challenged mentally.  Learning new things and meeting new people.  Those are the things that “stoke” me.

NH:  What do you think is most important in life? 

JB: The most important things in life are your health and your own happiness.  Without those two things, you can’t really put out positive energy.  If you don’t put out positive energy, you’re going to get negative energy.  Whatever you put out into the world is what you’re going to get back.  And some of the most important things in life are finding out what your passion is and believing in yourself.  That confidence is what is going to take you to the next level.  If you don’t believe in yourself, you’re not confident, and you’re not a leader, then that’s how people are going to perceive you.  And you don’t want that.

NH: So you believe that what you put out is what you get back?

JB: Yep.

NH: Why do you think we’re here? 

JB:  We are here to procreate as much as possible.  No, we’re all here to help each other out.  To make everybody’s life beautiful.  Everybody deserves to be healthy.  Everybody deserves to be financially set.  Everybody deserves to do what they love.  And there are people out there to help you.  There are people out there that feel they have to do things by themselves.  But that’s not true because everybody needs help.  No matter if you’re young, old, strong, weak, rich, poor.  Everybody needs help in everything in life.  And never feel afraid to ask, because one day it’s going to be them who’s asking, so help each other out now, you know?

NH: Do you believe in a higher power? 

JB:  Do I believe in a higher power?  Yeah, I believe in a higher power.  Like the beautiful storm system that brings in beautiful waves, or the power behind that fish going, ‘Man, I want to bite your line today.’  But, I’m not really religious, I’m more spiritual in the way that I think life is beautiful, and there is opportunity for everybody.  Maybe things happen for a reason.  Maybe, maybe.  And if, right now, that’s the reason that I’m paralyzed, I think I’m answering to the God above.  I think I’m doing the right thing.  Because at the end of the day, I’m the only one who really knows if I’m doing the right thing, and I have to put my head on my pillow and fall asleep and share my life with the people that I love.  And if I’m not doing it right, it’s going to be an uncomfortable, unhappy life.  I’m super happy, and I’m good, so I must be doing everything right.

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5 thoughts on “Happiness Interview: Jesse Billauer, Founder of the Life Rolls On Foundation

  1. Amazing! I love what this amazing man has accomplished and shown the world that the soul is very precious and strong. Thank you for the story and thank you Jesse Billauer, I am a fan, I respect you.

  2. Back in August I broke both my legs in motorcycle accident…
    as the EMT’s peeled me off the street it was apparent I might lose one of my legs below the knee.

    My mind immediately went to my awareness of Jesse as well as two personal friends who have been living in a wheel chair since age 18.

    The despair lasted only a brief moment and then my mind and attitude changed immediately… I would be ok, and I would keep a positive outlook, and my life might be different from here on – but there wasn’t any reason it had to suck and neither did my attitude.

    Look at Jesse, look at Jeff, look at Won I told myself… and then just like that I received the courage and the strength to begin my recovery – AND I would do that with a positive attitude and be thankful to and for all the people along the way.

    I feel blessed to have not lost my leg – it was completely shattered. I spent 3 weeks in the hospital and was grateful when I was introduced to my wheel chair and the opportunity to get out of bed and have some independence.

    Its been 4 months and I’m just beginning to walk again, yet there was a time when I thought I might not. And there’s a significant list of things I intend to do again, that I still can not. But guys like Jesse have given me the courage to try.

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